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 Brown Pelican CREDIT: PATRICIO ROBLES GIL Canada Geese CREDIT: THOMAS D. MANGELSEN Mallard CREDIT: PATRICIO ROBLES GIL Resplendent Quetzal CREDIT: FULVIO ECCARDI   
Western Sandpipers, Bécasseau d'Alaska, Playeros occidentales  (plural: Bécasseaux d'Alaska)  CREDIT: PATRICIO ROBLES GIL American Redstart, Paruline flamboyante, Chipe flameante  CREDIT: MICHAEL STUBBLEFIELD Magnificent Frigatebird	Frégate superbe, Fragata magnífica,   CREDIT: PATRICIO ROBLES GIL Sandhill Cranes, Grue du Canada, Grullas grises (plural: Grues du Canada)  CREDIT: ARTHUR MORRIS Osprey, Balbuzard pêcheur, Gavilán pescador  CREDIT: PATRICIO ROBLES GIL

Science Foundation

Conservation planning must be based on sound science. This planning will comprise several components:

  • Comprehensive monitoring of bird species and their habitats
  • Prioritization of species and their needs using standard and shared protocols
  • Setting objectives for priority species to guide implementation activities
  • Identifying conservation actions required to meet objectives
  • Conducting research to better understand the causes of population declines and how to address them
  • Evaluating conservation actions undertaken to allow us to adapt and modify implemented actions.

The science foundation was incorporated into the ecologically-based Bird Conservation Regions (BCRs) identified as the geographic units in which bird conservation will operate, and is also the basis of the plans that guide the implementation of conservation activities.